Horticulture Magazine

The Best Strawberry Planters For Home-Grown Fruit

strawberry fruits hanging over the edge of a wooden planter

Strawberry Planters are made in an astonishing variety of designs and styles ranging from strictly practical to highly decorative. They resemble stairs, cans, pitchers, and even shoe bags! But they have one feature in common: letting you home-grow luscious strawberries in a very tight space.

If you live in a flat, you would not have thought that you can enjoy fresh, luscious strawberries from your own ‘backyard garden.’ But you can! Strawberries can be grown in special planters or grow bags that you can place or hang on your balcony or terrace. If you live in a detached house you can – of course – put or hang these special planters in the patio or backyard.

Besides strawberries, one can also grow herbs, tomatoes, chilis, onions, radishes, garlic, beans, and other vines, and also succulents and some bedding plants, in most of the planters and bags reviewed underneath. As such, they could just as well be called ‘Berry-and-Veg Portable Planters.’

The designing and styling of every one of our choices is such that you can grow multiple kinds of plants in each planter, be it in conjoined pots or in attached pockets or cups. Thus, you can grow strawberries, beans, and chilis in a single planter even as you have verdant fronds and colourful florets tumbling over its edges, adorning your balcony or patio.

Factors for Evaluation

When evaluating Strawberry Planters, the objective criteria that come into play are quite limited. We need to consider the planting kit’s overall dimensions and volume, its material, and its price. It is the several non-quantifiable, subjective factors that are more important and not so clear-cut to evaluate.

As strawberries are both temperature-sensitive and light-sensitive, in locales with unpredictable weather it is a big plus if the container can quickly and efficiently be shifted. 

Strawberries require frequent watering but are also susceptible to overwatering and waterlogging so good drainage is required.

One or two growing solutions are perfectly suited to shallow-rooted strawberries and little else while others are equally well suited to growing quite a range of small plants. One or two planting solutions are wholly practical, one or two others are very attractive and ornamental while yet another gives you the opportunity to create your own ‘artwork,’ as it were. Finally, one must look into how robust and sturdy each planting solution is.

Our #1 Top Pick
6 x CrazyGadget® Strawberry Planter Trio 3...
Value Pick
Plant bag, strawberry plant bag, ventilation...
Also Consider...
Beanwood Wooden Herb, Strawberry & Flower...
Material
Plastic
Fabric
Wood
Colour
Black
Green
Natural Timber
Assembled
Floor Standing
Price
Price not available
Price not available
£49.99
Our #1 Top Pick
6 x CrazyGadget® Strawberry Planter Trio 3...
Material
Plastic
Colour
Black
Assembled
Floor Standing
Price
Price not available
Value Pick
Plant bag, strawberry plant bag, ventilation...
Material
Fabric
Colour
Green
Assembled
Floor Standing
Price
Price not available
Also Consider...
Beanwood Wooden Herb, Strawberry & Flower...
Material
Wood
Colour
Natural Timber
Assembled
Floor Standing
Price
£49.99

Last update on 2021-09-16 / All Pricing & Imagery from Amazon Product Advertising API

Underneath we look into the strengths and weaknesses of six very different Strawberry Planters.

Best Pick: CrazyGadget Stackable Strawberry Pots

CrazyGadget’s pots are not the most robust but the clever stackable design is a great space saver, and strawberries ‘take’ to these pretty planters.

Cost: Price not available

CrazyGadget’s planter set comprises of 18 small pots. You get six trios of radially conjoined flower pots that are (meant to be) stacked six high in alternating orientation so that each pot is exposed. Each of these is about 12.5 centimetres high and 14 centimetres in diameter at its mouth (the widest part).

The full six-level stack is about 75 centimetres high by 38 centimetres wide, not that you have to stack them six high or, indeed, at all. You can use each conjoined three-pot unit separately. Stacking is a space-saving technique that makes for a very efficient way to grow strawberries (and other small plants) on a balcony, deck, etc.

Though the interlocking design means that each layer is fitted on the layer below, stacking them more than three high may make the tower unstable so you need to make sure that the units are on a level floor and properly placed and balanced. A stiff wind or a rambunctious pet may just knock over an unstable stack. If you fear that the setup could go over, arrange them in two sets of 3-layer stacks.

One way or another, these stackable pots are stylish and pretty, and give you the opportunity to grow strawberries, herbs, and ornamental flowers, all in a tight space.

Though our selection is in ‘classic’ terracotta brown, a plus point of CrazyGadget’s stackables is the very appealing selection of bright hues they are available in. These include blue, green, pink, white, purple, and even multi-coloured which is particularly striking.

There are few, if any, flawed pieces. Quality control is doing its job here.

Now to the ‘minuses.’ These pots lack drainage holes so you’ll need to punch out one or two in each pot. As they are made of plastic, careless drilling or hammering will likely shatter or break the base. As such, the hole-making has to be done with TLC. Indeed, some TLC is required all round because the material is a fragile sort of plastic. 

Fragile or ‘un-fragile,’ the bottom line and the biggest plus is that strawberries just thrive in CrazyGadget’s pots so you’ll reap fulsome yields. Add to that the space-saving design, consistent product quality, and the very pretty setup, and this product outdoes a crowded field of contenders to land in our Best Pick notch.

Pros

  • Interlocking stackable design permits growth of 18 plants in a very tight space. 
  • Very pretty and decorative growing solution.
  • Excellent quality control – virtually no flawed or defective pieces.

Cons

  • The plastic material is not robust.
  • Drainage holes need to be drilled or punched in.

Value Pick: MZKJ Fabric Plant Bag

MZKJ’s value-for-money Plant Bag’s ‘busy’ design can make for a fussy job but it promotes pretty, ornamental setups and yields wonderful results.

Cost: Price not available

Sold in a pack of two, MZKJ Fabric Plant Bag has an unusual and appealing shape. It looks somewhat like a pitcher and this impression is further enhanced by the upper pockets which resemble spouts. 

It is available in Brown and Green. The ‘Brown’ colour is closer to a Salmon shade while the Green is a more pleasant light and limpid hue. For such a pretty-looking item, the odd Salmon shade and the lack of more colours is a glaring miss.

Each bag measures 42 centimetres high by 35 centimetres wide. It has 8 triangular side cups stitched into the sides. Each of these pockets is a dainty 14 centimetres deep and 14 wide at the mouth. As these cups are essentially mini-pots, this bag is particularly well suited to mixing and matching plants in a single bag for a brilliant display. For example, you could go with strawberry plants in the main cavity but a herb, a succulent, and a small flowering vine in the side cavities.

The capacity of MZKJ’s plant bag is 43 litres. It is made of a breathable fabric. It has a reinforced base in which there are three drainage holes which are also reinforced.

Besides being pleasing in appearance, this planting bag is strong and sturdy, relatively speaking. The stitching is up to the mark as seen on the two poly-fabric handles. These handles too are quite strong; however, do not expect to fill the bag with soil and then lift the bag by the handles – they may tear.

The ‘busy’ design can throw up a fussy job: if you want to create a showstopper arrangement with a variety of little plants then you have to make sure sufficient soil or compost reaches up into the pockets, plant different seedlings, and water them separately. But the final result will be an aesthetic winner, so the fussinness can have a big pay-off.

MZKJ Fabric Plant Bag is incredibly cheap for such a well-designed and well-crafted item with such distinct positives, and it runs away with our Value Pick riband.

Pros

  • Unusual and appealing shape with spout-like side pockets.
  • Can mix and match plants in the same bag for a lively display.
  • Remarkably inexpensive product is a top value for money.

Cons

  • ‘Busy’ design can create a fussy job. 
  • Available only in Green and a not-too-appealing Salmon.

Beanwood Strawberry & Flower Planter

Take a chance with Beanwood’s dodgy quality control and getting a flawed planter, and you may luck out with one that is as sturdy as it is lovely.

Cost: £49.99

Beanwood’s planter set comprises of six wooden mini-planters arranged in a staggered tier of six, akin to a miniature flight of stairs. It is supported by a leg brace at the rear in an A-frame design.

The setup measures 91 centimetres high by 30 wide and 63 deep. It has a volume of 13.5 litres.

This planter is smartly designed to give you more planting capacity in relatively little space. Moreover, it promotes remarkably aesthetic arrangements – you can alternate straweberries with herbs, flowers, or other ornamentals.

Unfortunately, Beanwood’s pretty planter has its fair share of problems.

The marketing material says that the planter is made of ‘pressure treated timber’ and that the ‘impregnated treatment . . . guards against rot,’ but these claims should be predicated with a qualifier: ‘If you’re lucky.’

The reality is that due to a virtual absence of quality control, individual units very widely in quality and that includes the type of wood used. Sometimes the timber is of self-evidently inferior quality and may split or warp within only a week or two. Or your unit may contain quality timber but the cutting and sizing may be so poor as to make, in turn, the assembled planter so shaky and wobbly as to leave you without any confidence in its reliability.

In a few too many units the pre-drilled holes are misaligned, a piece is a little too short or too long, or sometimes a part is missing altogether. Compensating for any such problem is Beanwood after-sales customer service which is truly outstanding.

For all these reasons, assembly varies from somewhat troublesome to fairly simple depending on the quality of the piece you get.

If you’re one of the lucky ones and strike a bulls-eye, you may get a rock-solid tiered planter made of high-quality wood.

More expensive than other strawberry-growing solutions, this costly product is a totally unpredictable value for money.

Those who are interested in style and aesthetics, and don’t mind taking a chance, and are willing to get on the phone to resolve any problems or to patch up a poor-quality, inferior unit should go for Beanwood’s planter.

Pros

  • If your luck is ‘on’ you’ll get a planter that is as lovely as it is sturdy.
  • Considerable planting volume in relatively little space.
  • Seller provides outstanding after-sales service.

Cons

  • Frequently plagued with fabrication and finishing problems.
  • A little too often the timber is of low quality.
  • Expensive product is a dicey buy.

FOVERN1 2 Strawberry Grow Bags

Though not optimally designed and ultra plain, it is dead simple to grow strawberries in FOVERN1’s wholly practical, value-for-money, grow bags.

Cost: £9.99

FOVERN1’s plain jane grow bags are cylindrical-shaped with dimensions of 38 centimetres in height by 22 wide. Each bag has 12 holes. The two bags together have a capacity of about 29 litres (and not ’10 gallons’!)

Advertised as being made of ‘high-quality non woven fabric’ that is ‘breathable,’ these bags are, in fact, made of good-quality felt of a rich, deep, dark green colour. 

Each grow bag has a reinforced handle which makes it portable and allows it to be hung. If your location has limited sun, the handles let you conveniently shift the bags from one spot to another. If slugs abound where you live, hanging these bags from a hook or rod that protrudes well off a wall will keep your strawberries safe.

FOVERN1’s grow bags are quite sturdy and built to last, at least for a few seasons, even several.

Because you will fill the bags to about one-third of the way up, the lowest hole is too low and the highest one is too high. Perhaps a better design for these bags would be for them to be a little wider across and a little shorter vertically so that the lowest plants’ roots are not deep-set in the soil and the highest ones’ roots are not floating in the air. That said, it is as easy as pie to grow strawberries in these bags.

These simple bags can create a highly decorative focus point when, besides strawberries, flowering plants are grown in it.

Nothing to look at, FOVERN’s grow bags are totally practical, they ‘just work,’ and those who value practicality and whose primary interest is luscious strawberries and not decor would do well to home in on this product. Moreover, it is very inexpensive and comes out to a really tidy value for money.

Pros

  • Doesn’t get any simpler and easier to grow strawberries.
  • Very practical and sturdy growing solution. 
  • Quite an attractive value for money.

Cons

  • The design is such that the lowest plants will get ‘too much soil’ and the highest ones, too little.
  • Aesthetic value is near zero.

Wrighteu 36-Pocket Wall-Hanging Planting Bags

Wrighteu’s 36-pocket wall-hanging planting bag has poor water retention but this unique product lets you create a joyful multi-hued ‘living wall.’ 

Cost: £22.99

Wrighteu’s planting bag comes in the form of 36 close-set pockets, arranged 6 across and 6 down, set in a 1-by-1-metre piece of good-quality felt fabric designed to be hung on a wall. The styling is similar to wall-mounted hanging shoe bags.

It is available only in an unexciting black colour. No choice of colours! As this bag is foldable, you can fold it in half – or even in a quarter – and hang it.  This ultimate space-saving plant-growing solution takes up no room at all on the ground or the floor.

The bag can be hung on a vertical surface, be it an interior wall or an exterior fence. It has five ‘metal eyelets’ along each of four sides. These eyelets are quite solid and of good quality. 

With so many pockets you can grow strawberries along three rows or columns with ample pockets left over for herbs and ornamentals. 

The sales material says ‘felt also retains moisture around the root ball’ but that is not so in practice as moisture retention is poor. If you want to grow plants that need moist soil, plastic liners will be necessary. 

On the other hand, the very flaw of this planting bag, i.e. poor retention of water, dictates light but frequent watering – which is just what strawberries need. For this same reason this bag is also perfect for succulents.

The design and style of Wrighteu’s planting bag makes it a canvas for the gardener-painter to create his or her floral work of art.

Wrighteu’s hanging bag is mid-priced, relatively speaking. However, the unique styling that makes it both the ultimate in making the most out of no floor space and also affording you the opportunity to create a fruity or floral painting makes it an attractive value for money.

Pros

  • Unusual wall-hanging growing bag is virtually unique.
  • Takes up zero floor space and is the ultimate space-saver.
  • Provides a ‘canvas’ on which to create your own floral artwork.

Cons

  • Available in only one, rather unattractive, black shade – ugh!
  • Water retention is very poor.

Tvird Strawberry Grow Bags

While it is very simple to grow strawberries in Tvird’s ideally-shaped bags, they are of poor quality, are prone to tearing, and are overly costly.

Cost: £11.89

Tvird’s grow bags are shaped like cans with dimensions of 45 centimetres high by 35 wide. Each bag has 8 side pockets that are 10 centimetres across and 8 deep. The two bags together – not including the side pockets – have a capacity of about 38 litres.

They are made of ‘breathable nonwoven fabric’ that is a thick felt. The porous fabric provides good drainage. The colour is rather an unsightly charcoal black.

These bags feature unusually good dimensions and design for growing strawberries, simply excellent on this point. A few plants can be grown in the main opening and one in each of the 8 side pockets per bag. Growing strawberries in these bags is a piece of cake.

Where Tvird’s bags let you down badly is in their construction and stitching. Boasting two ‘reinforced handles’ per bag, they should be portable. Well, portable they are not, nor are the handles ‘reinforced.’ If you pick up a bag that is even partway filled with soil or compost, the handles will come apart with a not-too-pleasant tearing noise. Either the stitches will suddenly come loose or the handles will rip out. 

The pockets too are prone to tearing if you are not careful. In sum, the construction and stitching is simply awful. They should have a ‘Handle With Care’ sticker on them.

If you intend to move around these grow bags you’ll have to place them on a pallet (or other base) that is fitted with wheels or casters. Otherwise, forget the handles and – heave-ho!

Tvird’s grow bags are very good for what they are meant for but they are poorly constructed, are not portable, and are relatively costly so it must be said that they are not a good value.

Pros

  • The shape and dimensions of these bags makes them near-perfect for strawberries.
  • Strawberries are grown easily and quickly.

Cons

  • Poor construction and also poor stitching.
  • Handles are prone to getting torn and coming off.
  • Not a good value for money.

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